RESOURCES

National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255
San Francisco Suicide Prevention: (415) 781-0500

Crisis Text Line: Text 741-741
Text with a trained volunteer to help you through difficult moments. 

As Featured In

 


 

The Mindful Relationship

LEARN MORE

Matchmaking Resources

SEE HERE

Client Portal

CLIENT RESOURCES

Meditations

MEDITATIONS
DATING AND RELATIONSHIPS

ARTICLES 

BOOKS

QUIZZES

E-COURSES

PODCASTS

 


 
MINDFULNESS + MEDITATION

CUSHIONS

MEETINGS

CLASSES

APPS

 


 
FOR COUPLES

COURSES + RESOURCES

BOOKS
  • Hold Me Tight by Sue Johnson
  • Passionate Marriage by David Schnarch
  • ACT with Love by Russ Harris, MD
  • Wired for Love by Stan Tatkin
  • Mating in Captivity by Esther Perel
  • The State of Affairs by Esther Perel
  • The Mindful Relationship by Lauren Korshak
  • Conscious Uncoupling by Katherine Woodward Thomas

PODCASTS
  • Where Should We Begin? by Esther Perel​
 

 
ANTIRACISM
 
BOOKS
  • Me and White Supremacy by Layla Saad
  • How to be an Anti-Racist by Ibram X. Kendi
  • White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo

RESOURCES

ORGANIZATIONS

 


 
COMMUNICATION + EMOTIONS

APPS
  • MoodNotes "Dental Floss for your mind" (for identifying cognitive distortions)
  • Mentegram for tracking your mental health

RESOURCES

PODCASTS
  • Brene Brown podcast

BOOKS 

 


 
FOR MEN

ARTICLES
 
MOVIE + RESOURCES

GROUPS

BOOKS
  • The Last American Man​ by Elizabeth Gilbert

 


 
FOR WOMEN

BOOKS
  • Women Who Run with the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkole Estes

MOVIES

WEBSITES & PODCASTS

 
MAKING PEACE WITH FOOD

BOOKS
  • Stop Bingeing, Start Living! by Shrein Bahremi
  • Within by Habib Sadeghi
  • Intuitive Eating by Elyse Resch and Evelyn Tribole
  • Eating in the Light of the Moon by Anita Johnston, PhD.
  • Women, Food, and God by Geneen Roth

GROUPS/ OUTPATIENT THERAPY

VIDEOS + Online Courses

 


PERSONAL GROWTH TOOLS

COACHING + PODCASTS

BOOKS
  • The Core by Michael Assedo
  • Radical Forgiveness by Colin Tipping

TOOLS
Heart Math Free Tools

 


 
ENERGY WORK 

 
SOMATICS

 


 
AGING

BOOKS

 


 
GRIEF, LOSS AND DIFFICULT TIMES

BOOKS

WEBSITE

 


 
ADDICTION

SPECIALISTS

MEETINGS

 


 
TEENS

SUPPORT CENTERS

LECTURE

BOOK
  • Transforming Stress for Teens

 
ADDITIONAL WELLNESS RESOURCES
 
MEDITATION CLASSES
 

 
WELLNESS RESOURCES
 

 
MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES
 

 
JOB RESOURCES
  • myanita.io - an app that helps you document and timestamp instances of workplace injustice 
  • EEOC - U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
  • Candor.co - Layoffs, hiring freezes, and support for those working in the tech industry
  • Zoom Tips for Highly Sensitive People - tips for self-care and fighting Zoom exhaustion
 

 
LOCAL + NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS FOR RACIAL EQUALITY
 

 
ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES + ORGANIZATIONS
 

 
ARTICLES + PODCASTS
 

 
EATING DISORDER SUPPORT
 

 
TIPS FOR TOUGH TIMES
A few tips that I've found to be helpful during difficult times: 
  • Identify your feelings at any given moment: Grief, fear, anxiety, sadness, hope
  • Take each day one step at a time. The future is uncertain, so do what you can for today. Keep reminding yourself "One step at a time." 
  • Accept and respect your feelings (Remember: Feelings are uncomfortable sometimes, but discomfort = growth! Also, feelings pass if we give them the space to do so)
  • Allow yourself to talk about uncomfortable subjects and feelings that you wouldn't have previously shared - let this be an experiment and see how it works out. New situations demand new coping skills and adaptations. 
  • Attune to your needs moment by moment: Ask yourself "What do I need right now, in this moment?"
  • Focus on prioritizing what you can control, i.e. thinking about your strengths, your attitude, actions, and day, and letting go of what you can't change, i.e. the economy, your plans for next month. 
  • Practice generosity. When people snap at you, or seem to be making your life hard, make it a practice to remember everyone is struggling and to assume an attitude of patience and a reframing that the person may have good intentions.
  • "Tend and Befriend." - Reach out to friends, loved ones, and community and let them support you. Reach out to a therapist if that's available to you. Tending and befriending is a helpful way to work through feelings of trauma. 
  • "Name it to tame it." - Practice naming your feelings, good and bad. "Oh, I'm feeling shame" or "fear" or "anger." Use a feelings wheel if you're having trouble identifying what you're feeling. 
  • Put things on your calendar to look forward to - volunteering, time in nature, dance parties, catch-up calls...
  • Create daily or weekly rituals at the same time or place to create some sense of stability and peace of mind - meditation or a bike ride at the end of your work day, a weekly Sunday dinner with family. 
  • Practice reframing: look for ways to change stressful thoughts into more hopeful stories for yourself
  • Find creative ways to express yourself - Nurture your creativity through art, music, cooking, writing, or whatever mediums speak to you. Let creativity guide you in making and finding meaning, an important aspect of integrating and dealing with traumatic life events.
  • Learn something new - Take the time to do an online course or read a book you've been meaning to
  • Cultivate compassion for others (actively practicing lovingkindness or prayer can help)
  • Reach out to others - to offer support and talk about how you feel 
  • Stay connected - check In with friends, family, and neighbors
  • If you're isolated, ask a friend to cowork remotely, host a remote gathering, or eat meals remotely
  • Find different ways to move your body. It's tempting to just walk or run in every free moment. Try a new movement class, biking, swimming, or a new sport that could be available to you in your home or outdoors (see resources above). 
  • Make ergonomic adjustments to your workplace - alternate sitting and standing and take movement or dance breaks between meetings, calls, or computer sessions.
  • Use this time to identify your core values and act from them. Start devoting time, energy, and structure to what you value, whether that is a healthy lifestyle, or creativity, business, or relationships. Ask yourself how you can show up in the world that you will feel good about.
  • Use a tracking tool to support your focus and forward motion towards something you value, so you can feel like you're engaged in something meaningful. For example, this tool for building racial equity. 
  • Remember you are not alone. There is a common humanity here. Whatever you are feeling, someone else is feeling it. Just to help you feel more validated....Everyone is struggling right now with one of the following: relationship stress, parenting overload, trauma, financial anxiety, workplace stress, housing stress, or job insecurity. 
  • Give, or donate, if you can (Research shows that giving activates the pleasure centers in our brain and helps us feel more well-being). Here's a good list of places you can donate to. 

Sign Up For Our Latest News And Events

We won't send spam. Unsubscribe at any time.